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Burbank City Government

Photographs of city buildings, employees and events.


Back of Burbank City Hall 1940s
Parked automobiles and a gas pump behind City Hall. Burbank’s City Hall was designed by architects William Allen and W. George Lutzi in a Streamline Moderne style, a type of Art Deco architecture (also sometimes described as “WPA Moderne”) that became popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Ground was broken on Olive Avenue, across the street from the old city hall, in 1941 and construction was completed in 1943. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996.
Bas-relief Sculpture on East Wing of City Hall
One of three bas-relief panels designed by artist Batholomew Mako (1890-1970) that adorn the exterior of City Hall. According to notes on the rear of the photo, the untitled east wing panel represents “a Jehovah-like figure representing religion,” a “Goddess of Plenty,” a “family scene,” and a “scene [that] represents the hurts of war.” Additional panels are present on the west wing of the building as well as on the Third Street-facing side. Mako was also responsible for the painting, “Justice,” that once hung in the police courtroom in City Hall and presently hangs in the City Attorney’s office.
Bas-relief Sculpture on West Wing of City Hall
One of three bas-relief panels designed by artist Batholomew Mako (1890-1970) that adorn the exterior of City Hall. According to notes on the rear of the photo, the untitled west wing panel represents “free men bearing the body of peace while an eagle hovers in the background; at right soldiers [are] on guard [while] mechanics work on an airplane.” Additional panels are present on the east wing of the building as well as on the Third Street-facing side. Mako was also responsible for the painting, “Justice,” that once hung in the police courtroom in City Hall and presently hangs in the City Attorney’s office.
Bas-relief Sculpture “Tribute to Craftsmen” on City Hall Facing Third Street
One of three bas-relief panels designed by artist Batholomew Mako (1890-1970) that adorn the exterior of City Hall. According to notes on the rear of the photo, this panel on the Third Street-facing side of the building is entitled “Tribute to Craftsmen,” and is the only one of the three reliefs on City Hall with a title. Additional panels are present on the east and west wings of the building facing Olive Avenue. Mako was also responsible for the painting, “Justice,” that once hung in the police courtroom in City Hall and presently hangs in the City Attorney’s office.
Building and Engineering Departments' Office 1940s
Interior view of the offices for the Building and Engineering Departments at City Hall in the 1940s. Burbank’s City Hall was designed by architects William Allen and W. George Lutzi in the Streamline Moderne style, a type of Art Deco architecture (also sometimes described as “WPA Moderne”) that became popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Ground was broken across the street from the old city hall in 1941 and construction was completed in 1943. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. The lettering on window at the center-rear of the photo says “Cashier”. The name plate on the counter to the left reads “Building Dept.”, and the lettering on window of the second-from-left office door reads “Building Superintendent”. The name plate on the counter to the right says “Engineering Dept., Street Dept.” and the lettering on the window of the office door on the far-right reads “City Engineer and Street Superintendent”. Notes on rear of photo: “4534-4. 0352. City Hall Interior – Engineering Dept circa 1940’s.”
Burbank Animal Control Officer at Animal Shelter 1982
Harold Hagler, Senior Animal Control Officer with the Burbank Police Department, standing next to two rows of cages at the Burbank Animal Shelter, holding a bowl and petting a gray cat inside an open cage. Inside one of the closed cages, a Siamese cat sits and looks out. Sign on wall reads “Price of cats and kittens. Cats & kittens -- $3.00. Tax -- .18. Spay/neuter dep. 25.00. $25.00 deposit will be refunded when the animal has been spayed or neutered. B.M.C.” Note on back of photo: “Harold Hagler. Animal Shelter-Pd. 1982.”
Burbank Animal Control Officers and Woman with Dog at Animal Shelter 1982
Fred DeLange (right), Superintendent of the Burbank Animal Shelter, with another unidentified officer and an unidentified woman stand and look at a white dog lying on a counter inside the animal shelter. Signs on the rear wall read “No animal accepted unless forms are correctly made out,” “Stray animals to first come 9:00 a.m. on available date,” and “Rabies vaccination certificate required before dog license can be issued, Sec. 9-402.1.” Note on back of photo: “Police dept – Animal shelter. 1982.”
Burbank Animal Shelter
Photo of Burbank Animal Shelter superintendent Fred DeLange and dog in front of an Animal Regulations van. According to the Burbank Leader, DeLange was superintendent from 1973 to 2001. Image was found among unlabeled negatives mostly dating from the early 1980s.
Burbank Animal Shelter
Photo of Burbank Animal Shelter superintendent Fred DeLange and dog at the shelter. According to the Burbank Leader, DeLange was superintendent from 1973 to 2001. Image was found among unlabeled negatives mostly dating from the early 1980s.
Burbank Animal Shelter 1940s
From notes on photo: “The original animal shelter- 40’s.”
Burbank Animal Shelter 1964
Photo of Burbank Animal Shelter and surrounding area, apparently taken on April 2, 1964 in preparation for the construction of a water treatment plant. The plant was opened in 1966, Also visible is a business with a sign reading "S&H Machined Products, 6 W. Burbank Blvd." "Picture of Water Reclamation Site from Burbank Blvd. overpass. 4-2-64"--back of photo.
Burbank City Council 1959
City photo of 1959 Burbank City Council. Back row, left to right: Newell Cooper and Earle Burke. Front row, left to right: Dallas Williams, Edward Olson, and Jerry Bank.

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